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Penguin Power

What can we learn from penguins? Even though we vary in size, shape and skin tone, we’re all part of the human race, and as such, we can work together to make sure everyone has their fair share - that everyone has their time in the "toasty center." We can share the work and the responsibility in our jobs, our families and our communities, perhaps even making sacrifices for those yet to come. After all, each of us CAN make a difference.

Motivational Quote:

Take the initiative and lead the way. You can make the difference.

Penguin Power

Penguins are pretty interesting creatures. They come in at least 17 different “varieties” from the largest Emperor penguins (up to 44 inches and 90 pounds!) of March of the Penguins movie fame to the smallest Little Blue penguins (adults can be 8 inches tall and 2.5 pounds!). Think of a Chihuahua standing next to a Great Dane for comparison. They’re both dogs, but, bow wow, what a difference.

Many penguins have learned to adapt to extreme weather conditions, partially through teamwork. Living in the frigid Antarctic, colonies of Emperor penguins huddle together to conserve heat and protect each other from the harsh wind. Individual penguins choose to move from the protected, toasty interior to the chilly perimeter so that each bird can enjoy some measure of warmth.

Male and female Emperor penguins share responsibility for the young, both making huge sacrifices in the process. After laying a single egg, the mother leaves it with her mate, then spends the next two months foraging for food – up to 50 miles away. The father keeps the egg warm by balancing it on his feet and tucking it under his “brooding pouch” as he stands erect. He does this for the entire time the mother is gone! He doesn’t eat a thing and loses a good portion of his body weight. When the mother returns, he must struggle to find food in his weakened state.

What can we learn from penguins? Even though we vary in size, shape and skin tone, we’re all part of the human race, and as such, we can work together to make sure everyone has their fair share – that everyone has their time in the “toasty center.” We can share the work and the responsibility in our jobs, our families and our communities, perhaps even making sacrifices for those yet to come. After all, each of us CAN make a difference.

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