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National 2014 February Holidays

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February Holidays
February Natioanl Holidays
National February Holidays
National Holidays
Fun February Holidays
Groundhog Day
Boy Scout Day
Random Acts of Kindness Weeks
President's Day
Leap Day
Successories Holidays

National Freedom Day

National Freedom Day is an observance in the United States that honors the signing of a resolution that proposed the 13th amendment of the nation's constitution on February 1, 1865. Abraham Lincoln, signed the resolution to outlaw slavery. The amendment was ratified on December 18, 1865. This anniversary is annually observed on February 1.

How to commemorate the National Freedom Day? Many people in the United States reflect on and remember the importance of freedom on National Freedom Day. The United States president may annually issue a proclamation on the day. Some educational institutions may incorporate themes relating to National Freedom Day as part of class discussion, readings, and other learning activities that explore the importance of the day and its history.

Groundhog Day

The origin of Groundhog Day starts in the 1700s when German settlers arrived to Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania. They celebrated a tradition known as Candlemas Day, which has an early origin in the pagan celebration of Imbolc. It came at the mid-point between the Winter Solstice and the Spring Equinox. Superstition held that if the weather was fair, the second half of Winter would be stormy and cold. If the sun came out February 2, halfway between Winter and Spring, it meant six more weeks of wintry weather.

In 1723, the Delaware Indians settled as a campsite halfway between the Allegheny and the Susquehanna Rivers. The Delawares considered groundhogs honorable ancestors. According to the original creation beliefs of the Delaware Indians, their forebears began life as animals in "Mother Earth" and emerged centuries later to hunt and live as men.

It is believed that Groundhog Day is the combination of these cultural beliefs.

Boy Scout Day

Boy Scout Day celebrates the birthday of Scouting in America. On February 8, 1910, Chicago publisher William Dickson Boyce created the Boy Scouts of America.

Scouting groups across the country celebrate this day. Often a cake will be served at the weekly meeting or on a camp out. Scout Sunday, the Sunday nearest the 8th of February, will often be marked with a church service, followed by a pancake breakfast.

Random Acts of Kindness Week

Random Acts of Kindness Week is February 13th - 19th, 2012

It is easy for you to pass kindness on and to celebrate kindness daily. Just think, "What would I like to have someone do for me?" And then do it for someone else. The smaller and more unexpected acts of kindness are as important as larger, necessary acts of kindness.

World Kindness Day is November 13th, 2012

World Kindness Week is November 7th - 13th, 2012

For more ways to spread kindness, check out The Random Acts of Kindness Foundation

Valentine's Day

Valentine's Day is more than just about love. It's about showing one's appreciation for another. It is more than appropriate to celebrate the day within a business or organization. Make Valentine's Day sweet by treating your staff with personalized chocolates or inspirational gift books.

National Blog Day

Successories announces new posts, new authors, and new style to our motivational blog. Read to get motivated and then take sometime out of your day to update or start your own!

President's Day

This year Presidents' Day falls on February 21, 2012. Originally known as Washington's Birthday, Presidents' Day falls on the third Monday of February. Presidents' Day is intended to honor all the American presidents, but most significantly George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. The 90th Congress was determined to create a uniform system of federal Monday holidays. They voted to shift three existing holidays (including Washington's Birthday) to Mondays. The law took effect in 1971, and as a result, Washington's Birthday holiday was changed to the third Monday in February and combined with Lincoln's Birthday to form Presidents' Day.

Mardi Gras

"Mardi Gras" means "Fat Tuesday." Traditionally, it is the last day for Catholics to indulge before Ash Wednesday starts the sober weeks of fasting that come with Lent. Mardi Gras has long been a time of extravagant fun for European Christians. In fact, some people think Mardi Gras celebrations have their source in the wild springtime orgies of the ancient Roman.

Traditional Colors of Mardi Gras are purple green and gold. Often, these colors can be found in mardi gras beads and mardi gras masks.

Leap Day

Every 4 years we have a Leap Year which means the shortest month of the year, February, grows by one day. The reason for this is that it takes 365.25 days for the earth to revolve around the sun. Traditional we go by a calendar year of 365 days. (Yes, we rounded down as the Earth goes round) But to keep time in line, we need to account for the .25 remainder. So... carry the 1 and boom every 4 years get to be 366 days long, the extra day being known as Leap Day!